Daily News

The NYT Magazine’s “1619 Project” is mostly progressive propaganda

Recently, The New York Times Magazine unveiled the “1619 Project,” a series of stories, interviews, and essays that commemorate the 400th anniversary of when slavery began in the country that would become the United States.

While education about slavery is an important aspect of America’s history and a way to ensure such evil doesn’t ever occur again, it’s clear that much of this project is a result of the NY Times’s progressive, revisionist historical approach, not a genuine desire to inform its readers.

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Calls to label Mexican cartels as terror groups as they grow stronger, more violent

The homicide rate in Mexico is rising at record-setting pace this year, with more than 30,000 murders in the first seven months.
It’s on target to hit almost 51,500 deaths by year’s end—about 1,000 more than in 2018 and 6,000 more than in 2017. That’s not accounting for the huge number of disappearances.

Cartel wars are causing bloodshed at the border, as well as in large port areas and major drug production areas.

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Annual Amazon farmland burn sets records for international outrage

Every year, farmers in the Amazon set fires to clear agricultural land during the dry season starting in August, but this year may be a record-setter, not for the number of fires, but for the global outrage.

The G-7 nations pledged Monday about $40 million to help fight fires in the Amazon rainforest in response to the outcry from celebrities, media outlets and leaders like French President Emmanuel Macron, who said the blazes represented an “international crisis.”

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On climate, Trump says he won’t lose nation’s wealth to ‘dreams and windmills’

“It’s tremendous wealth,” Trump told reporters gathered at the G-7 summit in France. “I’m not going to lose that wealth. I’m not going to lose it on dreams and windmills, which, frankly, aren’t working too well.”

Trump’s remarks came after White House aides acknowledged he skipped a session of the G-7 meeting focused on climate, biodiversity and the health of oceans. The White House said the president was taking part in other meetings during that session.

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Tom Cotton: The US should buy Greenland to fend off China

The United States should purchase Greenland from Denmark because China “understands not only Greenland’s geographic importance but also its economic potential,” Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., said Monday.

“Greenland is rich in a wide array of mineral deposits, including rare-earth minerals, resources critical to our high-tech and defense industries,” Cotton said in an op-ed in The New York Times.

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Prosecutors near decision on whether to indict CNN analyst, lying FBI agent Andrew McCabe

The 21-year FBI veteran was fired on March 16, 2018 after the bureau’s Office of Professional Responsibility and Justice Department inspector general determined that he displayed a “lack of candor” at least four times in interviews about his authorization of leaks to the media in October 2016.

The inspector general referred McCabe to the Justice Department for prosecution. The case is being handled by prosecutors in Washington, D.C.

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Idaho must pay for gender reassignment surgery for pedophile inmate

Idaho must pay for an inmate’s gender reassignment surgery, a federal court ruled on Aug. 23.

Mason Dean Edmo, 31, was convicted of sexually abusing a child under 16 years old, according to jail records. He is slated to remain in prison until July 2021.

Edmo, who now goes by the name Adree and says he is a woman, wants to get surgery that will remove his male anatomy in his effort to transition into a female. Because Edmo is a male, he has been held in a men’s prison.

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Court backs Christian videographers in same-sex wedding case

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals halted the expanding reach of nondiscrimination laws last week by ruling that Christian videographers in Minnesota who believe in traditional marriage can’t be compelled under the state’s aggressive human rights law to produce videos of same-sex weddings.

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Printer who nixed gay pride shirt goes to Kentucky Supreme Court

A Kentucky print shop owner who refused to make a gay pride T-shirt argued before the Kentucky Supreme Court that he shouldn’t be compelled to promote messages that go against his religious beliefs.

Blaine Adamson is owner of Hands-On Originals in Lexington and declined to print a shirt promoting an LGBT pride festival in 2012. The city’s Human Rights Commission said that refusal violated its gay-rights fairness ordinance.

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